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Project Name:
Jamaican Ornamental Fish Project Building Bridges
Description:

The Jamaica Urban Ornamental Fish Cluster funded by Compete Caribbean consists of approximately 170 relatively small, mostly home-based aquaculture farms located primarily in urban communities in Kingston, St. Andrew, St. Catherine and Clarendon.

It is led by The Competitiveness Company (TCC), a not-for-profit social enterprise based in Kingston that has been its main driver, marketer and advocate over at least the past five years. Objective: To promote the Jamaica Ornamental fish Cluster’s ability to efficiently deliver quality ornamental aquatic products to international buyers, at competitive market prices.

Through technical assistance from Compete Caribbean, the TCC was able to achieve:

  • Exported approximately 25,000 fish, including to buyers in a new market (Canada);
  • Entire value chain has completed training on standards, fish health and nutrition by globally recognized experts in the field;
  • Mortality rate of export fish has declined significantly;
  • Data collection and management system is now in use, with field staff having been trained in the use of the system and the tablets;
  • Completed design of the export (nexus) facility

Take a trip to Jamaica and the world of the ornamental fish farmer . . .

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Compete Caribbean is a private sector development program that provides technical assistance grants and investment funding to support productive development policies, business climate reforms, clustering initiatives and Small and Medium Size Enterprise (SME) development activities in the Caribbean region. The program, jointly funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Canada, and the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID), supports projects in 15 Caribbean countries. Projects in the OECS countries are implemented in partnership with the Caribbean Development Bank.

Project Name:
The Power of Innovation in the Caribbean
Description:

Kapil Mohabir of Plympton Farms – Guyana, Ronald Hinds of Teleios – Trinidad and Tobago and Duquesne Fednard of D&E Green Enterprises – Haiti speak candidly about their experiences working with Compete Caribbean as one of the private sector catalysts in the region.

In an event to celebrate the successful conclusion of Phase One of the Compete Caribbean Program, they all spoke under the theme “New Ideas that Change the Region: Innovation in the Caribbean” and touched on the barriers they faced regarding funding.

They each credited the creativity, structure and robustness of the Compete Caribbean Program as being responsible for their business accomplishments thus far. Take a listen . . .

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cc-event-footer-161121

Compete Caribbean is a private sector development program that provides technical assistance grants and investment funding to support productive development policies, business climate reforms, clustering initiatives and Small and Medium Size Enterprise (SME) development activities in the Caribbean region. The program, jointly funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Canada, and the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID), supports projects in 15 Caribbean countries. Projects in the OECS countries are implemented in partnership with the Caribbean Development Bank.

Project Name:
Compete Caribbean Resonates Deeply Regionally
Description:

By 2017, the Compete Caribbean Program directly created over 5000 jobs and indirectly contributed to another 6000. Of the direct employment created, approximately 80% of these jobs went to women and the average labour participation of women in beneficiary firms/clusters increased by approximately 15%.

Six years ago, the Compete Caribbean Program was launched with the goal of stimulating private sector development (PSD) in the Caribbean region. This year, 2017, marks the end of Phase One of the Program which is considered a resounding success by many in the PSD hemisphere.

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Compete Caribbean is a private sector development program that provides technical assistance grants and investment funding to support productive development policies, business climate reforms, clustering initiatives and Small and Medium Size Enterprise (SME) development activities in the Caribbean region. The program, jointly funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Canada, and the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID), supports projects in 15 Caribbean countries. Projects in the OECS countries are implemented in partnership with the Caribbean Development Bank.

Project Name:
Banane D’Haiti: Fast Becoming a Reality
Description:

Haiti Originale, LLC, the company behind Banane d’Haiti, was created to encourage sustainable job creation and economic growth in Haiti. The company’s success is moored to an unshakable belief in the resilience of the Haitian people and their ability to produce first world products and services with which global brands will want to partner.

Fuelled by research and technical assistance from international fruit and vegetable giant – Dole, the company knew, given the favourable costs of key factors of production such as labour and land, and the conducive climate and soils that it was possible to grow high quality, competitively priced Bananas from Haiti.

It also knew that it wouldn’t be easy to attract buyer interest in bananas grown in Haiti, an unstable country with significant political and social turmoil and no track record of exporting bananas, unless they had hard data to prove it could be done on a competitive and sustainable basis. So, they set out to do just that!

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Compete Caribbean is a private sector development program that provides technical assistance grants and investment funding to support productive development policies, business climate reforms, clustering initiatives and Small and Medium Size Enterprise (SME) development activities in the Caribbean region. The program, jointly funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Canada, and the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID), supports projects in 15 Caribbean countries. Projects in the OECS countries are implemented in partnership with the Caribbean Development Bank.

Project Name:
Grenada’s Protein from Waste Project Nominated for Awards
Description:

The Grenada Project – Protein from Waste Initiative, one of the most innovative and exciting projects under the Compete Caribbean Phase One portfolio, has been nominated for two international awards.

Both nominations fall under the United Nation’s banner. The first nomination is The United Nations Climate Change Secretariat’s, Momentum for Change Lighthouse Activities which shines a light on the most innovative, scalable and replicable examples of what people around the world are doing to tackle climate change. It further targets leading results-driven projects that are successfully addressing climate change. Successful awardees will be announced in September.

The second nomination is for The Equator Initiative’s Equator Prize for 2017. This year’s prize will be awarded to outstanding community and indigenous initiatives that are advancing nature-based solutions for local sustainable development.

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cc-event-footer-161121

Compete Caribbean is a private sector development program that provides technical assistance grants and investment funding to support productive development policies, business climate reforms, clustering initiatives and Small and Medium Size Enterprise (SME) development activities in the Caribbean region. The program, jointly funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Canada, and the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID), supports projects in 15 Caribbean countries. Projects in the OECS countries are implemented in partnership with the Caribbean Development Bank.

Project Name:
Pomeroon: From Gold to Coconuts
Description:

Over 150 coconut farmers in the Pomeroon, Guyana have tapped into the lucrative entrepreneurial opportunity of exporting coconut water resulting in significant growth for the country and its people.

In 2016, 150.2 tonnes of coconut water, valued at US$364,121, was exported and this activity has encouraged greater potential for 2017 and beyond.

The coconut production resurgence has also seen three regional buyers secured, the creation of 372 jobs plus the growth of female employment to 55%.

However, this picture of growth and prosperity was not always the case in the Pomeroon. A few years ago l and owners and farm operators abandoned their properties and turned their attention to the more lucrative earnings from Guyana’s gold mines.

However, in 2014, the Compete Caribbean Program collaborated with the Pomeroon Export Producers Association (PEPA ) to revive agricultural production in the Lower Pomeroon, improve the state of the farms and secure markets for export. Now, this remote territory which spans more than 20,000 hectares, has potential to be the key to both sustainable trade and social development in Pomeroon.

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cc-event-footer-161121

Compete Caribbean is a private sector development program that provides technical assistance grants and investment funding to support productive development policies, business climate reforms, clustering initiatives and Small and Medium Size Enterprise (SME) development activities in the Caribbean region. The program, jointly funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Canada, and the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID), supports projects in 15 Caribbean countries. Projects in the OECS countries are implemented in partnership with the Caribbean Development Bank.

Project Name:
Is there a Gender Gap in the Caribbean?
Description:

Female participation in the management and ownership of Caribbean firms is relatively high, compared to international standards.

Women-led businesses differ from other firms in the Caribbean along several characteristics, in particular, a larger presence of women in the management and ownership of the firms is often associated with smaller size, younger age, domestic ownership and limited access to finance.

Some of these stylized facts differ depending on the measure of the gender composition within the firm, lending support to the fact that having a different gender balance in the ownership or in the management is associated with different firm characteristics.

This paper focuses on the presence of a gender gap in firm performance and shows that women-managed firms are in fact less productive than other comparable firms, even after controlling for country and sector characteristics and for a large set of firm-level variables that drive productivity.

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cc-event-footer-161121

Compete Caribbean is a private sector development program that provides technical assistance grants and investment funding to support productive development policies, business climate reforms, clustering initiatives and Small and Medium Size Enterprise (SME) development activities in the Caribbean region. The program, jointly funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Canada, and the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID), supports projects in 15 Caribbean countries. Projects in the OECS countries are implemented in partnership with the Caribbean Development Bank.

Project Name:
Gender, Innovation & Productivity in the Caribbean
Description:

More than 50% of firms in many Caribbean countries are owned by men. These were the findings arising out of the study Gender Gap in the Region: The Performance of Women-Led Firms study authored by Winston Moore, Roberta Rabellotti and Andrea Presbitero in January 2017.

Moreover, only three countries: Grenada, St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Jamaica, can boast of at least 20% of their firms being predominantly owned by females. The Caribbean firms mostly owned by women operate in textile, food, retail and restaurants sectors often characterized by low productivity and low growth.

A combination of gender studies further reveal that contributing to the disparity are: Low labor force participation rate, low returns to Education despite high attainment, persistent gender wage gap, comparatively higher unemployment levels, low ratio of female senior executives, wide diversity of female firm ownership, gender based occupational segregation, and employment mostly in the services sector.

These factors are further entrenched by cultural values in the region. Since women play a triple role in society: reproductive, productive and community, their work and choices to start a business are linked to necessity, timing, location flexibility, family needs and child rearing. (Minniti, 2010).

This is accurately illustrated below:

Remarkably, the Gender Gap Study found that female owned firms are just as productive as male owned, but female managed firms are not. Mohan, Strobl, and Watson found that potential innovators have the largest percentage of female managers (24%), followed by innovators (18%) and non-innovators (12%). This would indicate that female managed firms are especially deterred by barriers to innovation.

The figure below suggests that female-led firms are more likely to face constraints in relation to crime, corruption, political environment, access to finance and access to land relative to their counterparts.

Based on recent conclusions, the objective is to support the creation of more productive firms, including a supportive environment for women-led firms to innovate and grow.

cc-event-footer-161121

Compete Caribbean is a private sector development program that provides technical assistance grants and investment funding to support productive development policies, business climate reforms, clustering initiatives and Small and Medium Size Enterprise (SME) development activities in the Caribbean region. The program, jointly funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Canada, and the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID), supports projects in 15 Caribbean countries. Projects in the OECS countries are implemented in partnership with the Caribbean Development Bank.

Project Name:
Caribbean Regional Entrepreneurial Asset Commercialisation Hub (R.E.A.C.H) Consulting opportunities; Deadline: December 16th
Description:

idb-caribbean-regional-entrepreneurial-asset-commercialisation-hub-r-e-a-c-h-consulting-opportunities

The Caribbean Regional Entrepreneurial Asset Commercialization Hub (REACH) has bee established by funding from the Inter-American Development Bank and is currently being executed by the University of the West Indies. The objective of the project is to foster innovation and competitiveness in Caribbean SMEs and will establish facilities that will provide support services for improved management through three main categories of available IPR tools (i) patents, industrial designs and utility models (technology transfer) (ii) copyrights in the creative industries, and (iii) trademarks and product branding of exporting companies.

Part of the proceeds from this project have been earmarked for consulting services geared towards the following:

A Regional Programme for the Creative Industries ( See full Terms of Reference here).

Design, Development and Implementation of a Pipeline of Innovative and Sustainable Technologies Ventures in the Caribbean (See full Terms of Reference here).

Proposals should be submitted electronically to the REACH Project Manager at AdminAssistantREACH@sta.uwi.edu by December 16th, 2016.

Project Name:
The Emergence of Experiential Tourism in Jamaica
Description:

Treasure Beach Cluster Moving Towards Ecotourism Development

St. Elizabeth, Jamaica- Treasure Beach is located on the southwest of Jamaica, on the South Coast of the Parish of St. Elizabeth and comprises of eight districts, namely: Calabash Bay, Sandy Bank, Billy’s Bay, Frenchman, Fort Charles, Great Bay, Bluntlers, and Beacon. Heritage sites and natural beauty spots are readily accessible, though not strictly within the target area. These natural assets are complemented by a community characterized by small hoteliers, farmers and tour operators who form the Treasure Beach cluster.

On July 3, 2014, Compete Caribbean (CC) provided Treasure Beach with a USD 500,000 grant to support the community in developing the tourism potential of the area and develop and market a unique brand of tourism for Treasure Beach, Jamaica. The funding would be used to support three main aspects of local tourism development- 1) Organizing the Treasure Beach enterprises for success ; 2)Development of a world class tourism product; and 3) Branding and advertising strategies.

October marked the closing of The Treasure Beach Cluster project, focused on supporting the Treasure Beach community to bolster the tourism potential of the area and develop and market a unique brand of tourism not only for Treasure Beach, and also for Jamaica as a whole. This was done by first encouraging the cluster to better understand the economic potential of the type of Tourism most suitable to their natural endowments and the extent to which they had the basis in terms of tourism related products and services to compete for tourists. In addition, at the start of the project more than 90% of the small businesses in Treasure Beach did not meet the standards or the formal requirements to participate in the industry. With technical assistance from CC, more than 60% of the businesses in Treasure Beach were able to achieve or start the process of achieving compliance with government regulations, and Jamaica’s tourism enterprise standards. The project even spurred the emergence of the new Tourism Product Development Co. Home Stay category, which extended the possibility of formalization to many operators in the Treasure Beach area. Compliance ensures that even the smallest tourism enterprises could actively participate in and benefit from a revitalized Treasure Beach economy.

In addition to developing the enterprises in Treasure Beach, the project also sought to develop the community’s brand of Tourism. Studies supported by the project revealed that at an increasing level tourists want authentic experiences from their travel and are willing to pay more for it. This helped to provide the basis for the development of Treasure Beach Journeys, or the refinement of authentic, people based experiences from Treasure Beach. From Captain Dennis’s Adventure Tours to Dawn’s Dancing Dinners or Jake’s pick your passion, a visitor to Treasure Beach can now engage in any one or all of the ten new experiences the project helped to develop. One community member is quoted as saying “the cluster group gives people confidence and gives people ideas, recognizing that they can turn something “everyday” into tours; ideas that you don’t need a ton a money to do”. Taking this to the world became the next challenge and emerging as a result of the support of the project was the new Treasure Beach Brand and e-commerce platform. With the tagline “you are born here”, the brand’s tone and feel were designed to elicit emotion around the key attributes of a Treasure Beach visit,
specifically that you feel as if you belong there when visiting and are forever changed after visiting Treasure Beach. Moreover, project resources were also dedicated to the development of successfully establishing and staffing a Destination Management and Marketing Organization (DMMO) which will hold the responsibility of managing the Treasure Beach brand and executing the community’s market strategy. The DMMO will serve the community and key stakeholders to educate them on the meaning and usefulness of the Treasure Beach brand to maximize its benefits.

The project motivated the cluster to work with the relevant public sector entities and achieved several notable results including the Tourism Enterprise Fund revolving loan fund and other financing options. There have also been public commitments from the local government to road improvement work in the area, and an ongoing support for community tourism in Treasure Beach. These fortuitous breakthroughs come after 20 years ongoing dialogue centred around the collaboration of Treasure Beach and the Jamaican government to fulfill the market potential that the community had to offer Jamaica’s tourism sector, and local residents agree that as a result of the Compete Caribbean intervention, the Treasure Beach community has been brought into focus with local stakeholders and its potential in the global niche tourism market.

Compete Caribbean has significantly contributed to the development of Treasure Beach’s tourism product and to marketing its unique brand of community based tourism. Treasure Beach now has a great deal of momentum on its side as well as an engaged tourism community, support from the Government of Jamaica and the opportunity to exploit a global trend in travelers seeking a more authentic and community based tourism experience.

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Compete Caribbean is a private sector development program that provides technical assistance grants and investment funding to support productive development policies, business climate reforms, clustering initiatives and Small and Medium Size Enterprise (SME) development activities in the Caribbean region. The program, jointly funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Canada, and the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID), supports projects in 15 Caribbean countries. Projects in the OECS countries are implemented in partnership with the Caribbean Development Bank.

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